Flour? or Flower? Power #SoCS 9/22/18

The English language plays tricks on us with words that sound the same  but have totally different spelling and meaning. Homonyms are a real difficult trait for those trying to learn our language. For instance a red flower is beautiful but if you have red flour it may mean that you and the knife had an argument in how to cut up the chicken you are going to fry and you lost. Or you can say this sentence ‘The read flower is beautiful’ which makes no sense because you can’t read a flower. Now you have stepped into homographs. Two words that are spelled the same but have different meanings and may sound different.

HomonynPics_900x
Homonyms
homographs
Homographs

No wonder people get confused trying to learn English and we are not even talking about the difference between England’s English versus America’s English plus the difference in each areas slang English or local English dialect of each region. And then there are other nations who have English as a second language. I worked for a Korean company for over 9 years in Alabama where there are strong ‘southernism’. Now a southernism is where you take half of one word and half of another word and push them together and make a new word but you say it so fast that people not use to the way you speak will just look at you like a deer in headlights. I think I have used most of these at least one(hundred thousand) time(s).

aslang

My boss was Korean and he learned to understand how I talked. When his boss would come down for a meeting, he would look to my boss and ask ‘what did she say’. After a couple of years, they acclimated to being able to understand us. Even some joined in on the southernism.

Linda G Hill’s Stream of Consciousness Saturday gave us a prompt to play with of flower/flour. Come join in on the fun and see how you can play with these two words.

 

 

6 thoughts on “Flour? or Flower? Power #SoCS 9/22/18

  1. I’ve just started studying Spanish and it’s so logical, relatively speaking. I can’t imagine what it would be like to learn English as a second language! Great post.

    Like

  2. I live next door in Georgia, and it is funny to hear people (especially Asians) start picking up the regional dialect. Of course, I grew up in Chicago and used “y’all” all the time. Someone suggested that should just be added to the language…

    Like

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